Monday, April 11, 2016

Praying Mantis

One of the earliest mantis references is in the ancient Chinese dictionary Erya, which gives its attributes in poetry, where it represents courage and fearlessness, Two martial arts separately developed in China have movements and fighting strategies based on those of the mantis.

Praying Mantises like me they come to my house, even here in New Zealand.



One the the advantages of living in a jungle within a city state is I got visited by all sorts of rare animals .
In 2004, on separate occasions two of these never seen before golden praying mantises came to my house and created quite a sensation. My friend, a nature society education liaised with an insect scientist. To his knowledge, he had not seen a golden praying mantis and was very keen to study it. But not before I took it to schools to show this to my children and teachers.
All the kids, (local Singaporeon and Interntional ones enjoyed looking at them. The Scientist took the one we named Goldie and later conjectured that it was



mutated from the ordinary praying mantise. It adapted to the colour gold from the tree that bloomed golden blossoms just outside my balcony. Goldie was a girl.
After Goldie went to be a science candidate, the kids from the campus were disappointed. Not long after, another came. I fed it with cricket bought from the pet fish shop. The scientist had hope that Magdeline would attract a male and perhaps we could breed it. Sadly Magadeline didn't survive. I immoralised her in a setting agent. Unfortunately, the agent beached Magadeline of this gold colour.
I posted it to the Nanyangconnect website with scientific literature, but they no longer keep the postings on archive.
Subsequently, I had green praying mantises.
***Chrissy and Alicia admiring Goldie. This is an experience they would take home to Canada and America***

A green baby praying mantis came to my teaching space window. I caught it and displayed it in a clear plastic cup. Kids love it.

Sunday, April 10, 2016

ABC Letter N for New Zealand




outrigger canoe :  New Zealand Māori: waka ama;  can sail very fast.

I will be traveling for 2 months and may not be able to post my entries.  Going to Singapore and Malaysia to launch my book.

http://abcwednesday-mrsnesbitt.blogspot.co.nz/

Saturday, April 9, 2016

FSO The Way we Were [Friday My Town Shoot Out Link-Up]



I drew this from memory of what my grandpa told me of his house in China 100 years ago. I used this as the cover of my book, One roof, two lives, and the book tells of life  of that era.

The Way we Were [Friday My Town Shoot Out Link-Up]

 

http://mytownshootout.blogspot.co.nz/

Monday, April 4, 2016

ABC Wed Letter M for models, mannequins





My latest book just released is about a woman who was a Fake in everything, including being a model.
mannequin (also called a manikindummylay figure ordress form) is an often articulated doll used by artists, tailors, dressmakers, windowdressers and others especially to display or fit clothing. The term is also used for life-sized dolls with simulatedairways used in the teaching of first aidCPR, and advanced airway management skills such as tracheal intubation and for human figures used in computer simulation to model the behavior of the human body. 
http://abcwednesday-mrsnesbitt.blogspot.co.nz/

Sunday, April 3, 2016

FSO: Funny




Share a fun post with us from your parts of the world. It's Aprils Fools Day after all!

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Wednesday, March 30, 2016

ABC Wed: Letter L for little


so cute when they were little. My littlest siblings  when they were little. The littlest one is  45.
http://abcwednesday-mrsnesbitt.blogspot.co.nz/

Wednesday, March 23, 2016

ABC Wednesday for Kiwi way of growing Kumara/sweet potato

Kylie explaining with a model who the early Maoris planted this important root crop.

Anau Smithy This is a metal model of a tàpapa. A kumara nursery. This was how Màori grew the vegetables.

Those of us coming from the tropics, it is very hard for us to conceptualize how difficult it is to grow plants in a cold country.

The Maoris were very successful in this. There are lots of volcanic rocks/scoria. These rocks retains the heat . They have a bed of rocks in the ground, plant the kumara/sweet potato, and then place more rocks on top. During the day, the sun heats the rock, and the heat is retained and the plants don't get ruin by the frost.
Anau Smithy I hope I am explaining it correctly to the readers from Malaysia. They are grown in moulds so the water will drain.


The long stick for heavy digging using the foot.
 Use a small forked stick like a Kiwi pecking in the ground so you not bruise the potato, When you locate one, get dirty and use your hand and fingers.
My friend Josephine volunteering to demonstrate and she got her reward, a big kumara.

I realised I didn't take a photo of the vines. It was winter and the plants were brownish. I came home and took my own.


I was privileged to go on a Outdoor education module during our conference.  After climbing the Mangere Mountain, we descended and came to this workshop.

Kylie showed us how the grew kumaras. The land is very fertile because of the volcano.
I planted my kumara too late. We had a big storm, and the gustly wind and tipped over some of my plants.
https://www.facebook.com/MangereMountainEducationCentre?fref=ts


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