Tuesday, March 3, 2015

ABC Wednesday Letter H for Hong (Red)

Lunar New Year celebrated by the Koreans and Chinese at Mt Albert baptist Church in Auckland.

Hong Baos, red package with Money. These contained a chocolate coin and a bible verse.

 We had our Chinese New Year dinner, and two Hong (red) Lions came to wish us luck. We fed the lions with Hongbaos. This has real money.


On Sunday, we had a Chinese New year celebration in Church. Our Chinese Pastor, Albert Ng brought a message. 

There was a sumptious morning tea after service.

Albert also had these HONGBAOS. I asked him for my students. The Kids love this with a chocolate coin inside.

http://abcwednesday-mrsnesbitt.blogspot.co.nz/

Monday, March 2, 2015

Happy Birthday, Dr Seuss





Cat in the hat,

One hundred and eleven years ago today, Dr. Seuss (or, Theodor Seuss Geisel) was born. When I was young in Borneo, my teacher never exposed me to this Cat in the hat.

When my kids were little, I read these books to them, without much conviction.




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Friday, February 27, 2015

New Zealand Chinese


     Autumn - February Newsletter 2015 Photo courtesy NZ Chinese.

Helen Wong of New Zealand Chinese wrote a wonderful review wrote a wonderful review in the New Zealand Chinese Asso Auckland Inc Autumn issue.

From China to Borneo and Beyond –
Ann Kit Suet Chin-Chan


I discovered this book, when I was at my printers
having some of my work printed. I picked up the book,
and was intrigued to read parts of it, as I flicked
through the pages.


Who was Ann Chin? I took a photo of the cover, and
added to my face book page and did the usual google
search. We made contact via face book, and had a
meeting. We swapped books – as you do.
Describers by the author as “a hundred year old
journal of two families, the Chans and the Kongs.”
recorded from 1907 to 2006. “From Kwang Zhou,
China, to the jungles of Borneo. It is a six generational
record with the second wave of movement to England,
Canada, Japan, Singapore, Australia, USA and New
Zealand.”


“The Opium war, virgin tropical jungle, Japanese
World War, colonial days, a revolution, a fight with the
communists; these were harshness and the difficulties
the families had to go through.”


Ann writes lovingly of each family person, from her
childhood memories, and gives us descriptive insights
– “Grandfather Kong … loved a drink or two, not too
much to make him drunk. When he visited us Mother
would offer him a bottle of Guinness Stout, an egg and
a big mug before her retired to bed. He poured the
stout into the mug, broke the egg into the stout and
drank the concoction. The creamy effervescent gave
him a white mustache on his upper lip and he made a
slurpy sound as his tongue licked the froth off… . We
used to cringe…when he swallowed the raw egg which
had sunk to the bottom of the mug. ”


The book is well written, and provides a distinctive
contrast to the lives that our own newly arrived New
Zealand forebears suffered during this period. It makes
me feel that they had it good.


From China to Borneo and Beyond – Ann Kit Suet
Chin-Chan Publication date: 1 March 2013 ISBN 10:
0473239000 and ISBN 13: 9780473239008


Ann Chin is the author of several books, including:
Diary of a Bereaved Mother, Goodbye my baby
Published 2011 ISBN 0473187094
Mail Order Bride ISBN :9780473254148


And is currently working on a new book.

Wednesday, February 25, 2015

ABC Wed letter G





This is the year of the goat according to the Chinese Zodiac, and it is Chinese New Year.

About 100 years ago, in 1907, my great grand dad left the village Guang Ning, near to Guangzhou city for Sibu, Sarawak.

In 1978, I left Sibu for Auckland.

In 1989, Guangzhou became a twin city of Auckland. I was very pleased and proud. I have not been to GuangZhou or China, but to be part of this twinning gave me a great sense of pride.

In 1999, the people of Guangzhou presented this statue of five rams to the people of their sister city. When I see it when I visit Myers Park, my chest swells with pride. It makes me want to visit Guangzhou.

Some of my adult ESOL students from Guangzhou ask, "You never been back? You should!"

May be I will, in the near future. The Water Engineer was in Guangzhou and he saw the same statue.

Guangzhou is the Hangyu pingyin or Mandarin name for what was Canton.

The Chinese prefer pork, the meat of the pig, instead of of the meat of the goat. (I play this word pig for letter G)







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ABC Wednesday Letter H for Hong Baos

Lunar New Year celebrated by the Koreans and Chinese at Mt Albert baptist Church in Auckland.

Hong Baos, red package with Money. These contained a chocolate coin and a bible verse.

On Sunday, we had a Chinese New year celebration in Church. Our Chinese Pastor, Albert Ng brought a message. 

There was a sumptious morning tea after service.

Albert also had these HONGBAOS. I asked him for my students. The Kids love this with a chocolate coin inside.

http://abcwednesday-mrsnesbitt.blogspot.co.nz/

Monday, February 23, 2015

ABC Wednesday Letter G








Good friends Messrs John Sciacaluga and John Chan attended in St Mary's College in Strawberry Hills, London in the 50s John S came from Gilbrator, John C (Dad) from Borneo/
They were best mates and became lifelong educationist. They remained in touch. My Dad talked so much about John in England .



My Dad visited them in 1989. They had so much to talk. They had so much

John will be 100 years old next week. My Dad did not make 90.

http://abcwednesday-mrsnesbitt.blogspot.co.nz/

ABC Wednesday Letter H for honey


These are very good for you.

Some Manuka honey has an antimicrobial property not shared by other honeys. This property is called the Unique Manuka Factor (UMF®) antibacterial property.

The little jar is UMF 25+. and is worth it weight in gold. It is good as a balm, when you are on the onset of a flu, it will help to check it in time. Though, I find it too sweet.



Leptospermum scoparium (Manuka or Tea tree or just Leptospermum) is a shrub or small tree native to New Zealand and southeast Australia. You may have heard of the Manuka Honey or the Tea tree oil.

The honey comes from the bees who harvest the wild Manuka and the oil from the berries. I always have a bottle of Manuka or Tea tree oil which is very good for skin problems.

I took these photos in a public park in Western Auckland. My friend Ngarimu and his Maori tribe are involved on replanting native bush in his tribal land at Orakei. It has the dual purpose of planting a medicinal plant and preventing erosion.

American Mr Lloyd strongly believes that manuka honey dressings saved his leg from amputation. So convinced that he came on the cruise liner Millennium to meet the people who changed his life.
Manuka products have high antibacterial potency for a limited spectrum of bacteria and are widely available in New Zealand. Similar properties led the Māori to use parts of the plant as natural medicine.

Kakariki parakeets (Cyanoramphus) use the leaves and bark of Manuka and Kanuka to rid themselves of parasites. Apart from ingesting the material, they also chew it, mix it with preen gland oil and apply it to their feathers.[3]


Manuka honey, produced when honeybees gather the nectar from its flowers, is distinctively flavoured, darker and richer in taste than clover honey and has strong antibacterial and antifungal properties. The finest quality Manuka honey with the most potent antimicrobial properties is produced from hives placed in wild, uncultivated areas with abundant growth of Manuka bushes. However a very limited number of scientific studies have been performed to verify its efficacy.





The University of Waikato in Hamilton, New Zealand has formed the Waikato Honey Research Unit to study the composition of honey and its antimicrobial activity. The Active Manuka Honey Association (AMHA) is the industry association that promotes and standardizes the production of Manuka honey for medical uses. They have created the Unique Manuka Factor (UMF) standard which grades honey based on its anti-bacterial strength. In January 2008 Professor Thomas Henle, University of Dresden (Germany)[4] identified Methylglyoxal as the active compound in Manuka honey. This is now shown on products as MGO Manuka honey. E.g. MGO 100 represents 100mg of Methylglyoxal per kilogram.[5]


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