Monday, January 17, 2011

My World Tuesday: Grass seeds



http://showyourworld.blogspot.com/

Do you have any idea if these seeds are edible?

Dar might be right. I found these at the beach. We eat oats everyday, Thanks Dar, you save me some money if go and harvest them.

There is plenty at Half Moon bay.

Sea oats are well suited to saline environments, and as such, are important to barrier island ecology and are often used in soil stabilization projects because their long root structure firmly holds loose soil. Sea oats are a protected grass in most states along the East Coast. Picking or disturbing sea oats is punishable by fine in Georgia and Florida.

'The Clan of the Cave Bear' is a 1986 film based on the book of the same name by Jean M. Auel.Directed by Michael Chapman, the film stars Daryl Hannah as Ayla, a young Cro-Magnon woman who was separated from her family during an earthquake and found by a group of Neanderthals.

Yesterday, I was thinking about the Book I read about ten years ago, and couldn't think of the title. But I remember it now. It's about the clan who harvested seeds.

11 comments:

Dar said...

Anne, that looks like sea oats. I'm not sure if it's eatable but worth looking into. I would think you could thatch it like any other oat and make a meal of it. I'd do more research first. Try a garden center that may sell grasses or the good ol' internet. I'll look too cause, you sure have my curiosity up. Sea Oats are mainly used as an ornamental dried plant or to prevent erosion at the seaside.
BlessYourHeart

Ann said...

Dar might be right. I found these at the beach. We eat oats everyday, Thanks Dar, you save me some money if go and harvest them.

There is plenty at Half Moon bay.

Serline said...

It's like the mangrove in these parts then, vital to erosion prevention, but being cleared at an alarming rate in the name of progress...

Titania said...

Hi Ann; I like grasses and their flowers. Grasses are good looking at any stage of their life. I guess most of them have edible seeds. Aeons ago,
when we were collecting our food from the wild, grass-seeds were a valuable source
of food, later we pounded them with stones to bake sort of a "focaccia"!

Sarawakiana@2 said...

These are lovely pictures of stuff I have never seen ...so educational and so lovely! thanks.

Kay L. Davies said...

It will certainly be interesting if they turn out to be edible. You won't need to add salt!
-- K

Kay, Alberta, Canada
An Unfittie's Guide to Adventurous Travel

Dave said...

Just take care eating them Ann. They just might be poisonous - specially if they have been sprayed with something! - Dave

Titania said...

Ann, thank you for your comment. No, I have not read this book. I did some research what we ate then and what we eat today.

Judy Sheldon-Walker said...

So many things that grow wild are edible, but you would do well to research first.

Ann, thanks for your visit and I grew up with chickens and ducks too, except our ducks flew away one fall and never returned.

Marja said...

Learned something new. Very interesting. Oh and earth quakes seem to have always pestered humanity . We had some bad ones yesterday with stuff falling of the shelves again.

Sara Chapman in Seattle, USA said...

It never occured to me that grass seeds might be edible. I'd like to know! Lovely photo.