Monday, April 5, 2010

Save our World, Preserve old buildings, Acacia Cottage








http://reducefootprints.blogspot.com/

The Acacia cottage in Cornwall Park is Auckland's oldest surviving building. It was built by John Campbell in 1841. When he died at a great age in 1912 he was buried on the summit of One Tree Hill. Beside his grave is an obelisk recording his respect for the Maoris and their achievements.

It is preserved and open free of charge for the public to view. The rooms are glassed off so spectators don't cause damage by touching or sitting on the chair.

This is important for the young generations to have a first hand knowledge of how our fore fathers lived when there was no electricity, no telephone and needless to say, no internet. I must say, I lived like this in Borneo when I visited my grand parents during my holidays.

Once last year, there was a power cut in modern day Auckland. I found that I couldn't do anything. As everything in my house is powered by electricity. I couldn't cook as my stove, oven and stove top needed power. My phone was cut off, I couldn't use the computer, it was too cold to go outside, the list goes on. The police announced that because the traffic lights were not working, people were requested not to leave their houses, shops were closed because the cash registers cannot be used, the EFTPOS and Credit cards cannot be used, the list goes on. This was 2009.

7 comments:

Sarawakiana@2 said...

How beautiful to have a well preserved building like this....Wishing for Sibu to have such conservatory skills and passion.....

Debbie said...

That looks like a beautiful place Ann!~ Thanks for stopping by today and you lovely compliment on my home, we sure do appreciate it!~

Jama said...

It's a quaint little house! I've never live in a house without electricity, even in kampung house we have proper lightings not those kerosene lamps.Nowadays it's rare to have blackouts here in Singapore.

Bunglon Blog said...

hello ..
may I come in here
greetings friendship
i like your blog
happy blogging..succesful!

Cheryl said...

A very nice building indeed. How wonderful that there are people who care so deeply about preserving their countries history. Children today must be so amazed when they see such museums such as this one, imagine no computers, no tv and no cell phones!!

Faith | UPrinting said...

Isn't that great? After how many centuries, the house is standing still and looks so wonderful, where exactly is that place? I want to go there and take a look at it myself.

Ginny said...

Your blog is so interesting,and full of facts I didn't know. Thanks for visiting mine. The Easter bread is available only at Easter, and is the National Easter Bread of Italy. I see you have posted hot cross buns and the Passover meal like I did, so we have some things in common. My son and his family are Baptists and go the the local church here. My husband and I are Mennonites. I have been so much enjoying learning about New Zealand. I love your post of your Easter things, and also the acacia cottage. Acacia is a type of honey, it is my favorite and I buy it all the time, though rather expensive. I'm assuming the acacia flower is where it comes from. I love the way you photographed the glass walls with the reflections, especially the corner one, at first I couldn't even tell it was a reflection. I also enjoyed learning about The Blur effect in phototography and that it has a name. Feel free to e-mail me if you like, my address is on my profile.